Among teens who have had relationships, talking on the phone (39%) ranks second for everyday interactions, followed by instant messaging (29%), being together in person (21%), social media (21%) and messaging apps (20%).

Social media and mobile technology now permeate the lives of many teens, including their romantic relationships.

A new Pew Research Center survey of 13- t0 17-year-olds examines how teens flirt, date and even break up in the digital age.

Here are six key findings: When it comes to meeting romantic partners, most teens do this offline.

Half of teens (50%) say they have friended someone on Facebook or another social media site as a way to show romantic interest, while 47% have expressed attraction by liking, commenting on or interacting with that person on social media.

Additionally, 55% of teens say they show interest in someone by flirting with them in person.

Teens also flirt by sharing something funny or interesting with their crush online (46%) or sending flirtatious messages (31%).Less popular flirting tactics include making their crush a music playlist (11%), sending flirty or sexy pictures or videos of themselves (10%) or making a video (7%). Nearly three-quarters (72%) of teen daters say they spend time texting with their partner daily.Only 8% of teens say they have met a romantic partner online.For the small share of teen daters who have met a romantic partner over the internet, Facebook was cited more than any other social media site as a way that teens connect with potential partners.Aside from in-person flirting, social media is the most common way teens express interest in someone they have a crush on.Although most teen romantic relationships do not start online, digital platforms serve as an important tool for flirting and showing romantic interest.